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Name:   Mack - Email Member
Subject:   Red Beans and Rice in a Crock Pot
Date:   11/5/2010 7:38:41 PM

Fairly easy and pretty good in front of a fireplace with a hot blaze going. Prep time about 6 hours.

- 1 lb dry red beans sorted for "bad stuff" (sticks/rocks/etc)
- 6 strips bacon
- 1 pound chopped smoked ham (ham chunks/leftover ham/pickled pork/ham steaks, etc)
- 1 pound smoked sausage ( your favorite) split in the middle and cut in 1 inch pieces
- 1/4 pound Chorizo Spanish sausage (good luck finding it, except in Miami) sliced in 1/4 inch pieces
- 1 large yellow onion chopped
- 3 celery stalks chopped
- 1 green bell pepper chopped
- 3 Bay leaves, pinch of cayenne, 1/2 tsp salt and pepper
- 3 Tbs chopped garlic
- 8 cups chicken broth (maybe more)
- Loads of fluffy white rice ( cooked with olive oil and garlic cloves on board)

Soak beans overnight in maybe 1 quart of water. Drain the next day.
In a large skillet, fry the bacon to crispy and remove. Add the onion, pepper and celery plus the salt, pepper, cayenne, garlic, to make the "trinity" until tender. Medium heat.
Add the ham/sausage/chorizo and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. I said a large skillet.
Dump skillet into crock pot. Add bay leaf. Add drained beans. Add chicken broth. Blend contents.
Set crock pot on High and cook for maybe 4 hours covered, ckecking for liquid. Add more if it gets dry.
When the beans get tender, smash some against the side of the pot, stir and continue cooking to thicken liquids. Taste it. If too bland, add cayenne or other hot spices.
Serve over the rice, with chopped green onions and the crispy bacon. Side of avocado salad/balsamic vinegar/cuban bread. Crispy white wine, followed by an espresso. Close the fire grate and, and, well, dream good dreams. Ya' know?





Name:   Talullahhound - Email Member
Subject:   Red Beans and Rice in a Crock Pot
Date:   11/5/2010 8:05:44 PM


I found traditional dried chorizio sausage on Amazon.  Not particularly cheap, but authenic and very delicious.



Name:   Maverick - Email Member
Subject:   Publix Carries Chorizo (eom)
Date:   11/5/2010 8:30:49 PM





Name:   Mack - Email Member
Subject:   Publix Carries Chorizo (eom)
Date:   11/5/2010 10:42:04 PM

I think I know that chorizo, but if it is the one I am thinking about (refrigerated, like hot dogs?), that is a Mex chorizo. Not bad at all, but not like a Cubano chorizo. This one is a smoked, dried, non-refrigerated sausage with very different seasonings and completely different flavor. It is used in many Cuban recipes, like soups (caldo gallego), stews (paella), roasts (boliche). Not so much for the meat, but for the bold flavors.

Got a fresh shipment of choriso and guava paste coming about mid-November via Calle Ocho. Pastellitos too.





Name:   Talullahhound - Email Member
Subject:   Chorizo
Date:   11/6/2010 10:22:41 AM

I seem to recall that there are several kinds of fresh chorizo -- Argentine, Mexican, Costa Rican, etc.
I wanted the dried Spanish (as in Spain) for a paella.  It's a totally different product than those fresh ones. 

Sounds like you have a "source"... LOL. 

What do you do with the Guava paste?



Name:   Mack - Email Member
Subject:   Correction
Date:   11/6/2010 12:23:40 PM

I referred to this chorizo as Cuban. It is imported from Spain and used in Cuban dishes.
Guava paste is really mis-named. Paste it is not. It is thick, like over-cooked jelly. We use it as a dessert. Sliced in small thin squares, matching squares of super sharp cheddar on a favorite cracker. Also use it in pastry baking as the sweet center.
Good stuff in small doses.





Name:   Tall Cotton - Email Member
Subject:   Chorizo Question
Date:   11/6/2010 5:24:12 PM

Could you take the fresh stuff and smoke it until it renders out all the fat and get close to the same flavors?



Name:   Talullahhound - Email Member
Subject:   Chorizo Question
Date:   11/6/2010 6:21:35 PM


I think the seasonings are completely different.  But, it's an interesting thought and would be curious to see what you get.



Name:   Mack - Email Member
Subject:   Chorizo Question
Date:   11/6/2010 7:44:34 PM

Cotton, I don't think so. As TH said, the seasonings are all different. Spanish chorizo is heavy on garlic and smoky paprika. Not at all like the fresh kind. As I said, spanish food recipes use it for seasoning mostly. Spanish restaurants use it for Tapas, and bud, it is good beside chunks of powerful cheeses and high colesterol breads (ie. lard) and a cold beer.
Google Spanish Chorizo. Interesting reading.
Mack



Name:   Little Talisi - Email Member
Subject:   Chorizo Question
Date:   11/11/2010 4:48:58 PM

the Fresh Market in Montgomery has Spanish Chorizo.





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