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Name:   MrHodja - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   9/30/2017 10:11:05 PM   IP ADDRESS: 76.26.151.153

i saw that an A 380 had a catastrophic engine failure...disintegration might be another term.  Fortunately it's emergency return to Mother Earth was successful.

What protocol does a pilot use when losing thrust on one side of the aircraft...with the A 380 there was one functioning engine on the side with the failure so I would imagine increased throttle on the good one on that side and somewhat retarded throttle on the side with two good engines would help, along with rudder as needed.  But almost all of the commercial aircraft in the US have just two engines, not four, so loss of one is probably harder to deal with.

So what corrective measures does a pilot take when experiencing the loss of one of two engines.  "Enquiring minds want to know", lol.  Obviously rudder helps, but are there other options that would increase drag on the side with the good engine that would fool the aircraft into thinking that its thrust was coming from its center rather than the side still able to maintain thrust?





Name:   Shortbus - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   10/1/2017 12:19:45 AM   IP ADDRESS: 75.137.207.126

In the 777 simulator, loss of engine makes the software automatically kick in 7 degrees of rudder.





Name:   CAT BOAT - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   10/2/2017 9:42:13 AM   IP ADDRESS: 97.78.153.220

Can I answer Pilot questions also?  I do have a piece of paper in my pocket.  





Name:   twc - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   10/2/2017 2:10:09 PM   IP ADDRESS: 68.184.68.44

Since UEM is not answering, and, since I have a little experience with this, mind if I answer? 

Short answer, an engine failure in modern aircraft is more an inconvenience than an emergency. Sure, nobody wants to deal with such an inconvenience but they happen from time to time. In a 2 engine commercial airline type aircraft, you have many systems to assist with the loss of thrust in an engine failure. Rudder boost or rudder bias. A system that uses bleed air from the operating engine to assist in opposit rudder to counteract the loss of thrust from the failed engine. In aircraft with hydraulic controls, you might have boosting from the hydraulic system. 

But there are certifications standards that must be met. With airline types and even many private jets are certificated under part 25 of the Federal Aviation Regulations. By standard, they have to accelerate to a take off decision speed (V1) and either abort the take off or, have sufficient runway to accelerate to VR (rotation speed) and continue the take off successfully. Those numbers vary with weight and temperature and field elevation and are calculated for every take off AND a 1.15% adjustment is added to those numbers. Even more,for wet or contaminated conditions. 

For 3 and 4 engine jets, there are additional requirements and some restrictions are removed for obvious reasons. I don't have any 4 engine experience so I can't speak directly to that. But you are correct, loosing the far outboard engine would cause some aerodynamic factors but I do know that the certification standards are the same. 

Hope this answers your questions. 

Peace,

TC





Name:   MrHodja - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   10/2/2017 2:36:22 PM   IP ADDRESS: 166.137.240.60

Thanks.  I kinda figured my answer would be simplistic :-).  When I was on active duty we were flying in an old Air Force recip, with the door open from the passenger section into the cockpit when right smack dab in the middle of the Aegean Sea both engines died.  Needless to say that was exciting, but had to laugh when one of the pilots....both were "senior"....looked up at his gauges, calmly changed a couple settings, and the engines came back to life.  Seems they had failed to switch fuel tanks and ran out of gas!





Name:   twc - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   10/2/2017 3:53:14 PM   IP ADDRESS: 68.184.68.44

Lol, been there, done that!

i don't instruct a lot but I am active. And I have several things I say frequently that my students are always throwing back at me. One is:

flying is really simple unless you overthink it. 





Name:   MrHodja - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   10/2/2017 4:26:52 PM   IP ADDRESS: 166.137.240.60

Worked once with a WW II pilot who used to tell me the two most useless things to a pilot are the air above and the runway bbehind the plane.

Is there such a thing as being too old to get a private pilot license?





Name:   Lifer - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   10/2/2017 4:46:45 PM   IP ADDRESS: 174.255.199.38

First thing on my list would be to change pants. ??





Name:   Summer Place - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   10/2/2017 5:55:31 PM   IP ADDRESS: 99.1.60.70

Sorry McGill could not answer your question, he was out back giving cooking lessons to CAT.





Name:   twc - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   10/2/2017 6:32:20 PM   IP ADDRESS: 68.184.68.44

No sir, there is no age limit. Matter of fact, it’s recently become easier to get and keep a medical certificate. It’s new and some of the requirements keep changing but you only have to have the medical exam from an FAA approved doctor once. Thereafter, you self certify via a website and have your regular doc sign a form every 2 years I think. Like I said, it’s new so some of the requirements, I’m not fully aware of yet. 

I usually tell folks, everybody can learn to fly. Not everybody should. 





Name:   Shortbus - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   10/3/2017 8:10:49 AM (updated 10/3/2017 8:40:13 AM)    IP ADDRESS: 75.137.207.126

I heard Cat was thrown out of the galley and back into the cockpit................something about qualifications?

 

Sorry, my buddy is not a 380 Captain:

Hey Shortbus,

 
I fly the Airbus A-330; -200 and -300 models.
 
How was your hurricane party a few weeks ago? I was flying back from Rome on that Monday when the winds in ATL were really bad.
 
 
But I'm sure there are engine out procedures for his types.
 
 
 




Name:   buffalo - Email Member Reply
Subject:   Question for McGill
Date:   10/4/2017 9:09:49 AM   IP ADDRESS: 73.82.150.127

TC,

Great answer TC.  As a B767 Captain we practice V1 cuts (loss of engine thrust at rotation) routinely.  We have found engine failures in the weather a few seconds after rotation to be a challenge that we also extensively train for.  Internationally we also have driftdown procedures on the NAT (North American Track System) tracks back and forth to Europe.  Being out of VHF radio coverage and having only satcom including CPDLC (Controller Pilot Data Link Communication) and HF add to the tasks, but the old adage we learned very early in flight school Aviate, Navigate and Communicate still are foremost in our minds.

Semper Fi,

Buffalo







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